Monday, November 24, 2014 Kislev 2, 5775
The Cat's Meow
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Last summer, Hadassah Magazine devoted one of its covers to a story on Jewish graphic novels, and proclaimed, for all the world to see, that an art form had at last "come of age." The work featured on the cover was French artist Joann Sfar's The Rabbi's Cat , which has been published in the United States by Pantheon to...
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In early November, The New York Times ran an article about fashion photographer Lillian Bassman, who was, in the 1940s and '50s, a leading light at Harper's Bazaar , where her striking, experimental fashion images first appeared. Then, as times and tastes changed, she fell into obscurity, and almost stopped taking pictures altogether. A small number of photographic connoisseurs remembered...
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An acerbic take on all things literary
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When it was announced in 1981 that Elias Canetti had been awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature, people were mostly in the dark about who he was. At the time, he was 76 years old, a Sephardic Jew born in Bulgaria, living in England, with an array of books to his credit. In actuality, he was far less fashionably obscure...
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The Grapes of Roth
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As those with any interest in the book world know by now, Philip Roth has become only the third living American writer to be chosen by the Library of America to have his complete works published in uniform editions. The two authors before him - Saul Bellow and Eudora Welty - have passed on since their anointments. That leaves Roth,...
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Jewish Women and Their Salons , published by Yale University Press, has the look, feel and proportions of a coffee-table book, and yet it's so much more than that limiting term implies. Subtitled The Power of Conversation , it is the work of Emily D. Bilski and Emily Braun, with additional essays contributed by Leon Botstein, Shira Brisman, Barbara Hahn...
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