Tuesday, September 16, 2014 Elul 21, 5774

Robert Leiter

Former Senior Editor
An acerbic take on all things literary
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When it was announced in 1981 that Elias Canetti had been awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature, people were mostly in the dark about who he was. At the time, he was 76 years old, a Sephardic Jew born in Bulgaria, living in England, with an array of books to his credit. In actuality, he was far less fashionably obscure...
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One of the cover stories in the Exponent this month dealt with how Chanukah merchandising has exploded and how all of the December holidays - and not just Christmas - have been recognized, especially by those businesses that create holiday cards, food baskets, seasonal decorations and wrapping materials. It was just a matter of time before magazines caught up with...
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The wretched behavior of intellectuals never fails to startle, and the shenanigans of Jean-Paul Sartre and his mistress Simone de Beauvoir seem to grow more deplorable as new revelations pile up. Back in 1993, Bianca Bienenfeld, the daughter of Polish Jewish refugees, who'd been passed back and forth between the two writers beginning in the late 1930s, published her memoirs,...
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One reading experience I truly enjoy is perusing a magazine I think I know, and then stumbling upon an article that cuts completely across the grain. Such was the case with the December issue of Harper's Bazaar . Scads of beautiful women - decked out in some of the world's most fabulous fashions - had been gathered together, with commensurately...
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The Grapes of Roth
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As those with any interest in the book world know by now, Philip Roth has become only the third living American writer to be chosen by the Library of America to have his complete works published in uniform editions. The two authors before him - Saul Bellow and Eudora Welty - have passed on since their anointments. That leaves Roth,...
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Profile

Robert Leiter served as senior editor of the Jewish Exponent before retiring in Dec. 2013. 

In his 30 years with the paper, he won many awards and held many positions, from full-time reporter to interim editor. For five years in the early 1980s, he was managing editor of Inside magazine, the Exponent's sister publication, and for seven years in the 2000s, he was the quarterly's editor in chief, while still working full time for the paper.

Since the mid-1980s, he reported from most of the major capitals of Europe for the Exponent, with an emphasis on the Eastern Bloc countries, during and after Communist rule. Throughout this period, he visited Poland, the two Germanies and the Soviet Union with greatest frequency, but also made visits to Austria, Hungary, Czechoslovakia, Bulgaria, Romania, the former Yugoslavia, Ukraine, Latvia, Lithuania and Estonia. He has also reported from Catalonia, Alsace, Zurich and Venice, as well as from Costa Rica, Norway, India and the Middle East. A number of his journalism awards have been for his reporting from Europe.

He is a contributing editor to The American Poetry Review, which is based in Philadelphia, and in the 1980s, he served as Murray Friedman's assistant to the U.S. Civil Rights Commission in Washington, D.C.

He has also been a freelance writer for 40 years and his book reviews, short stories, essays, interviews and profiles have appeared in The Nation, The New Republic, CommonwealDissent, The American Scholar, The Hudson Review, The New Leader, The Forward, Moment, Redbook, The Pennsylvania GazetteThe Philadelphia BulletinThe Philadelphia Inquirer, Philadelphia magazine, The New York Times, The New York Times Book Review, Partisan Review and many other mainstream local and national publications.

Contact

215-832-0726

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