Sunday, December 21, 2014 Kislev 29, 5775

Robert Leiter

Former Senior Editor
Media Clippings
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When David Brooks was at The Weekly Standard, I enjoyed almost everything he wrote. He seemed to revel in the freedom he'd been given at the magazine, and when his editors cut him loose, especially on longer features, he took full advantage of it. But when he moved on several years ago to the opinion pages at The New York...
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Richard Hofstadter: Exemplar of the engaged intellectual
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For those with certain political leanings who came of age in the 1960s, Richard Hofstadter was the historian of note, the writer from whom we learned much about the American political sensibility and how it worked. The titles of his many books -- distinctive, evocative, unmistakably his -- bring to life an era and a portion of the intellectual underpinnings...
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Media Cl​ippings
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The German Problem. You could say, without exaggeration, that it was the animating force of 20th-century history. (The only other element to exert as much influence was the Russian Revolution, which was tied to the German problem in its way.) Germany's particular "complex" got a new reading recently in a book review published in the June 19 issue of The...
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Known for her novels, it's her essays that really resonate
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In 1989, in the preface to her second collection of essays, Metaphor & Memory , Cynthia Ozick stated that "a fiction writer who also writes essays is looking for trouble." What she meant is that the essays will likely be scoured by critics for certain "clues" that will then be used as evidence for or against the fiction. I understand...
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Media Cl​ippings
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I've just caught up with one of the cleverest pieces I've read in months, Louis Menand's "Talk of the Town" article in the June 26 New Yorker about cell-phone ring tones and what they say about aging ears. It seems there's a certain sound that can't be heard by most of those over 20. As Menand explained it, "the tone...
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Profile

Robert Leiter served as senior editor of the Jewish Exponent before retiring in Dec. 2013. 

In his 30 years with the paper, he won many awards and held many positions, from full-time reporter to interim editor. For five years in the early 1980s, he was managing editor of Inside magazine, the Exponent's sister publication, and for seven years in the 2000s, he was the quarterly's editor in chief, while still working full time for the paper.

Since the mid-1980s, he reported from most of the major capitals of Europe for the Exponent, with an emphasis on the Eastern Bloc countries, during and after Communist rule. Throughout this period, he visited Poland, the two Germanies and the Soviet Union with greatest frequency, but also made visits to Austria, Hungary, Czechoslovakia, Bulgaria, Romania, the former Yugoslavia, Ukraine, Latvia, Lithuania and Estonia. He has also reported from Catalonia, Alsace, Zurich and Venice, as well as from Costa Rica, Norway, India and the Middle East. A number of his journalism awards have been for his reporting from Europe.

He is a contributing editor to The American Poetry Review, which is based in Philadelphia, and in the 1980s, he served as Murray Friedman's assistant to the U.S. Civil Rights Commission in Washington, D.C.

He has also been a freelance writer for 40 years and his book reviews, short stories, essays, interviews and profiles have appeared in The Nation, The New Republic, CommonwealDissent, The American Scholar, The Hudson Review, The New Leader, The Forward, Moment, Redbook, The Pennsylvania GazetteThe Philadelphia BulletinThe Philadelphia Inquirer, Philadelphia magazine, The New York Times, The New York Times Book Review, Partisan Review and many other mainstream local and national publications.

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