Saturday, September 20, 2014 Elul 25, 5774

Robert Leiter

Former Senior Editor
Or when is it enough: A biographer's dilemma
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When Florence Noiville's Isaac B. Singer: A Life arrived in my office, just the look of the book -- it's sheer lack of heft -- made me sit up and take notice. Here was the biography of a major 20th-century writer -- a Nobel Prize winner, at that -- and the volume topped off, with index, at under 200 pages...
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Media Clippings
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Magazines are having to rethink themselves in all sorts of drastic ways due to Internet dominance, but I never thought that would happen to The New Republic, which has been a fixture in my reading life for more than 40 years. But according to two New York Times articles -- one on the arts pages, the other in the business...
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Media Clippings
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I recall thinking, shortly after the Sept. 11 attacks occurred -- and especially once The New York Times began printing, day after day, those small, heartbreaking biographies of the victims who'd perished in the twin towers -- that this heartache would never end, not ever for the survivors, and perhaps not for the country as a whole. But the majority...
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When you think of great works of modern architecture, the first things that likely come to mind are the towering skyscrapers of New York or Chicago, or the great variety of eclectic homes built for special clients, like Frank Lloyd Wright's monumental Fallingwater, commissioned by a Pittsburgh department-store magnate and set deep in the woods of western Pennsylvania. But another...
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Levi trumps Darwin, somewhat sadly, of course
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Several months ago, the Royal Institution of Great Britain did an astonishing but wholly appropriate thing: It named Primo Levi's The Periodic Table as the "best science book ever written." The Levi volume, which is made up of 21 sections, each tied to one of the elements of the periodic table, beat out estimable works by James Watson, one of...
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Profile

Robert Leiter served as senior editor of the Jewish Exponent before retiring in Dec. 2013. 

In his 30 years with the paper, he won many awards and held many positions, from full-time reporter to interim editor. For five years in the early 1980s, he was managing editor of Inside magazine, the Exponent's sister publication, and for seven years in the 2000s, he was the quarterly's editor in chief, while still working full time for the paper.

Since the mid-1980s, he reported from most of the major capitals of Europe for the Exponent, with an emphasis on the Eastern Bloc countries, during and after Communist rule. Throughout this period, he visited Poland, the two Germanies and the Soviet Union with greatest frequency, but also made visits to Austria, Hungary, Czechoslovakia, Bulgaria, Romania, the former Yugoslavia, Ukraine, Latvia, Lithuania and Estonia. He has also reported from Catalonia, Alsace, Zurich and Venice, as well as from Costa Rica, Norway, India and the Middle East. A number of his journalism awards have been for his reporting from Europe.

He is a contributing editor to The American Poetry Review, which is based in Philadelphia, and in the 1980s, he served as Murray Friedman's assistant to the U.S. Civil Rights Commission in Washington, D.C.

He has also been a freelance writer for 40 years and his book reviews, short stories, essays, interviews and profiles have appeared in The Nation, The New Republic, CommonwealDissent, The American Scholar, The Hudson Review, The New Leader, The Forward, Moment, Redbook, The Pennsylvania GazetteThe Philadelphia BulletinThe Philadelphia Inquirer, Philadelphia magazine, The New York Times, The New York Times Book Review, Partisan Review and many other mainstream local and national publications.

Contact

215-832-0726

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