Saturday, August 30, 2014 Elul 4, 5774

Robert Leiter

Former Senior Editor
Not entirely, but be prepared to think these poems through
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Paul Celan, like Tadeusz Borowski and Primo Levi, was a writer and survivor who committed suicide many years after leaving the horrific universe of the Nazi death camps. Celan is not as widely known as Levi -- his work is far too fearsome in its depth and obscurity to ensure a wide readership -- though he is considered by discerning...
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Despite a centuries-old history marked by misunderstanding, acrimony and often deadly conflict, Poles and Jews -- against all logic -- manage somehow to continue speaking to one another. The dialogue may, in fact, have entered one of its most interesting phases. This was the combined judgment of the three participants in a recent panel discussion devoted to this troubled but...
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In advance of the Super Bowl, Bruce Weinstein, Ph.D., aka "The Ethics Guy" at BusinessWeek.com , decided to make himself the most popular fellow around the water cooler by going after office gambling, which he definitively declared to always be a "bad bet." "Office pools involving cash are common, exciting and potentially lucrative," he wrote. "But they can violate corporate...
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One of my all-time favorite books is Lost New York , a compilation of photos, sketches and text that explain all the architectural wonders that we Americans somehow allowed people to destroy throughout the recent history of Manhattan. The long-lamented original Pennsylvania Station at 33rd Street -- one of the greatest creations of the fabled McKim, Mead and White firm...
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... and ours: The story of a Philadelphia street
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Bruce Buschel's first book, Walking Broad , published recently by Simon & Schuster, has an almost unbeatable premise. Not that it's so outrageously novel. Many other writers have wandered about cities -- generally along major, world-famous thoroughfares -- in search of the heart and soul of a particular urban terrain and its populace. In fact, this little trick was especially...
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Profile

Robert Leiter served as senior editor of the Jewish Exponent before retiring in Dec. 2013. 

In his 30 years with the paper, he won many awards and held many positions, from full-time reporter to interim editor. For five years in the early 1980s, he was managing editor of Inside magazine, the Exponent's sister publication, and for seven years in the 2000s, he was the quarterly's editor in chief, while still working full time for the paper.

Since the mid-1980s, he reported from most of the major capitals of Europe for the Exponent, with an emphasis on the Eastern Bloc countries, during and after Communist rule. Throughout this period, he visited Poland, the two Germanies and the Soviet Union with greatest frequency, but also made visits to Austria, Hungary, Czechoslovakia, Bulgaria, Romania, the former Yugoslavia, Ukraine, Latvia, Lithuania and Estonia. He has also reported from Catalonia, Alsace, Zurich and Venice, as well as from Costa Rica, Norway, India and the Middle East. A number of his journalism awards have been for his reporting from Europe.

He is a contributing editor to The American Poetry Review, which is based in Philadelphia, and in the 1980s, he served as Murray Friedman's assistant to the U.S. Civil Rights Commission in Washington, D.C.

He has also been a freelance writer for 40 years and his book reviews, short stories, essays, interviews and profiles have appeared in The Nation, The New Republic, CommonwealDissent, The American Scholar, The Hudson Review, The New Leader, The Forward, Moment, Redbook, The Pennsylvania GazetteThe Philadelphia BulletinThe Philadelphia Inquirer, Philadelphia magazine, The New York Times, The New York Times Book Review, Partisan Review and many other mainstream local and national publications.

Contact

215-832-0726

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