Saturday, December 27, 2014 Tevet 5, 5775

Robert Leiter

Former Senior Editor
A painter comfortable with the uncomfortable
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When the artist R.B. Kitaj died at age 74 in October of last year, The New York Times ran a respectful, studied sort of obituary, under the headline "Painter of Moody Human Dramas." Kitaj (pronounced kit-EYE), who was Jewish and American-born but who spent the bulk of his career living and working in England, was always a controversial figure, beloved...
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The fate of the electronic book and its effect on publishing was the subject of yet another article in the Arts section of The New York Times . Reporter Edward Wyatt began by asking "Is the electronic book approaching the tipping point?" This was a topic, he wrote, that both "energized and unnerved" people attending BookExpo America out in Los...
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A gimmick to engage or a real disclosure?
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Philippe Grimbert's Memory , which comes billed as a novel, yet one undeniably based in fact, also comes laden with a number of plaudits and prizes, all of them listed prominently on the cover. We are told that the book was a bestseller in France, the winner of the prestigious Prix Goncourt, winner of Elle magazine's readers' prize and winner...
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Media Clippings Whenever intellectual quarterlies approach the issue of Israel -- and especially if it's a journal I admire -- I tend to cringe. Such was the case when I picked up a recent volume of Salmagundi . On the cover, I read the words Zionism and Apartheid , which was the headline affixed to an essay by Derek Cohen...
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A writer and producer, his wife, his dog — and his big break
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Like so many other American families in the 1980s, ours fell in love with Michael J. Fox the minute he took up the role of Alex P. Keaton on "Family Ties," one of those classic TV sitcoms that grew better with each season. If anyone was born to play a part, it was Fox; the role fit him like a...
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Profile

Robert Leiter served as senior editor of the Jewish Exponent before retiring in Dec. 2013. 

In his 30 years with the paper, he won many awards and held many positions, from full-time reporter to interim editor. For five years in the early 1980s, he was managing editor of Inside magazine, the Exponent's sister publication, and for seven years in the 2000s, he was the quarterly's editor in chief, while still working full time for the paper.

Since the mid-1980s, he reported from most of the major capitals of Europe for the Exponent, with an emphasis on the Eastern Bloc countries, during and after Communist rule. Throughout this period, he visited Poland, the two Germanies and the Soviet Union with greatest frequency, but also made visits to Austria, Hungary, Czechoslovakia, Bulgaria, Romania, the former Yugoslavia, Ukraine, Latvia, Lithuania and Estonia. He has also reported from Catalonia, Alsace, Zurich and Venice, as well as from Costa Rica, Norway, India and the Middle East. A number of his journalism awards have been for his reporting from Europe.

He is a contributing editor to The American Poetry Review, which is based in Philadelphia, and in the 1980s, he served as Murray Friedman's assistant to the U.S. Civil Rights Commission in Washington, D.C.

He has also been a freelance writer for 40 years and his book reviews, short stories, essays, interviews and profiles have appeared in The Nation, The New Republic, CommonwealDissent, The American Scholar, The Hudson Review, The New Leader, The Forward, Moment, Redbook, The Pennsylvania GazetteThe Philadelphia BulletinThe Philadelphia Inquirer, Philadelphia magazine, The New York Times, The New York Times Book Review, Partisan Review and many other mainstream local and national publications.

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