Sunday, December 28, 2014 Tevet 6, 5775

Robert Leiter

Former Senior Editor
By:
Four years ago, Temple University Press published the wildly popular P Is for Philadelphia , a bright splash of an alphabet primer that takes young readers -- and adults, if they so choose -- for a tour of the City of Brotherly Love via illustrations done by area public-school children. (A city-wide art contest determined which drawings would be featured.)...
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A slice of Jewish life in an Asian community
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Back in February, NPR's "Morning Edition" ran a piece about Shanghai's Jewish history, and how the 1-square-mile area where Jews had settled after fleeing Hitler in the late 1930s and early '40s was being threatened by the wrecking ball. It seems that the wish to widen a road could possibly set the ball in motion, destroying a number of buildings...
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Last year, just in time for Pesach, the antiquarian bookseller Historicana, founded in 1987 and still run by Irvin Ungar out on the West Coast, published a new, highly detailed and quite exquisite version of The Szyk Haggadah. Illustrated by Polish-born artist Arthur Szyk, this version of the beloved text had been created in Europe as Hitler was coming to...
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How the Nazis nearly managed to loot it all
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The Nazi plunder of Europe -- and most particularly, the theft of all things possessed by Jews -- has been slowly documented over the last 10 or 15 years, the avariciousness chronicled in all its horrid detail. The plethora of books that have appeared have depicted the wholesale ransacking of Jewish businesses, homes, parcels of land, Swiss bank accounts and...
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Chagall and the world he fashioned in his art are becoming something of a cottage industry for Yale University Press. Not surprisingly, this ever-resourceful publishing house has proven itself up to the challenge. In fact, in the space of two seasons, it has issued three separate and quite distinct titles that deal with the Russian-born Jewish artist. First was Vitebsk...
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Profile

Robert Leiter served as senior editor of the Jewish Exponent before retiring in Dec. 2013. 

In his 30 years with the paper, he won many awards and held many positions, from full-time reporter to interim editor. For five years in the early 1980s, he was managing editor of Inside magazine, the Exponent's sister publication, and for seven years in the 2000s, he was the quarterly's editor in chief, while still working full time for the paper.

Since the mid-1980s, he reported from most of the major capitals of Europe for the Exponent, with an emphasis on the Eastern Bloc countries, during and after Communist rule. Throughout this period, he visited Poland, the two Germanies and the Soviet Union with greatest frequency, but also made visits to Austria, Hungary, Czechoslovakia, Bulgaria, Romania, the former Yugoslavia, Ukraine, Latvia, Lithuania and Estonia. He has also reported from Catalonia, Alsace, Zurich and Venice, as well as from Costa Rica, Norway, India and the Middle East. A number of his journalism awards have been for his reporting from Europe.

He is a contributing editor to The American Poetry Review, which is based in Philadelphia, and in the 1980s, he served as Murray Friedman's assistant to the U.S. Civil Rights Commission in Washington, D.C.

He has also been a freelance writer for 40 years and his book reviews, short stories, essays, interviews and profiles have appeared in The Nation, The New Republic, CommonwealDissent, The American Scholar, The Hudson Review, The New Leader, The Forward, Moment, Redbook, The Pennsylvania GazetteThe Philadelphia BulletinThe Philadelphia Inquirer, Philadelphia magazine, The New York Times, The New York Times Book Review, Partisan Review and many other mainstream local and national publications.

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