Thursday, September 18, 2014 Elul 23, 5774

Robert Leiter

Former Senior Editor
By:
There are some artists who seem to come into the world with their styles intact -- no years of insecurity and searching for them. They know what they want to say and how to say it, and then proceed, for the remainder of their careers, to simply ring brilliant changes on their original vision, startling us again and again with...
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Words about a different kind of relationship
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In addition to once being the New York Times restaurant reviewer and then the editor of the fabled -- but recently dismantled -- Gourmet magazine, Ruth Reichl is best known for her memoirs Tender at the Bone and Comfort Me With Apples . These books tell of her relationship to food and family; and, especially in the former, she told...
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Whenever the topic of torture and the mistreatment of prisoners is revisited in the media, as it has recently been with President Obama's hesitance over closing Guantanamo Bay, my mind returns to the most powerful piece of writing on the subject that I've ever run across. This particular essay also happen to be part of one of the most significant...
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But that was then, this is now; today's Rittenhouse belongs to everyone
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SPEAKING VOLUMES When I was a child, there was no locale in this city that represented White Anglo-Saxon Protestant privilege more than Rittenhouse Square. The staid-looking buildings that surrounded the park back then, along with the lovely booths, fountains, sculptures and pathways that marked the leafy interior, seemed to whisper to a young Jewish boy like me: "This terrain is...
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The story of survivor Lev Aronson and his beloved cello
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SPEAKING VOLUMES The Lost Cellos of Lev Aronson . It sounds like the title of one of those wistful, purposely sentimental novels that seem to be pouring out of publishing houses by the barrel-full these days. But, in reality, the work, written by poet Frances Brent, is another heartbreaking Holocaust tale, this time about a real artist who was brutalized...
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Profile

Robert Leiter served as senior editor of the Jewish Exponent before retiring in Dec. 2013. 

In his 30 years with the paper, he won many awards and held many positions, from full-time reporter to interim editor. For five years in the early 1980s, he was managing editor of Inside magazine, the Exponent's sister publication, and for seven years in the 2000s, he was the quarterly's editor in chief, while still working full time for the paper.

Since the mid-1980s, he reported from most of the major capitals of Europe for the Exponent, with an emphasis on the Eastern Bloc countries, during and after Communist rule. Throughout this period, he visited Poland, the two Germanies and the Soviet Union with greatest frequency, but also made visits to Austria, Hungary, Czechoslovakia, Bulgaria, Romania, the former Yugoslavia, Ukraine, Latvia, Lithuania and Estonia. He has also reported from Catalonia, Alsace, Zurich and Venice, as well as from Costa Rica, Norway, India and the Middle East. A number of his journalism awards have been for his reporting from Europe.

He is a contributing editor to The American Poetry Review, which is based in Philadelphia, and in the 1980s, he served as Murray Friedman's assistant to the U.S. Civil Rights Commission in Washington, D.C.

He has also been a freelance writer for 40 years and his book reviews, short stories, essays, interviews and profiles have appeared in The Nation, The New Republic, CommonwealDissent, The American Scholar, The Hudson Review, The New Leader, The Forward, Moment, Redbook, The Pennsylvania GazetteThe Philadelphia BulletinThe Philadelphia Inquirer, Philadelphia magazine, The New York Times, The New York Times Book Review, Partisan Review and many other mainstream local and national publications.

Contact

215-832-0726

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