Thursday, September 18, 2014 Elul 23, 5774

Robert Leiter

Former Senior Editor
The great architect was a font of ideas, but he rarely got the chance to fulfill them in Philly
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A lovely confluence of elements occurred recently in the world of architecture, and both of them, in a sense, have benefited Philadelphia. First, Susan G. Solomon published her important and insightful book Louis I. Kahn's Jewish Architecture: Mikveh Israel and the Midcentury American Synagogue , out from Brandeis University Press. Then, Beth Sholom Congregation in Elkins Park, one of the...
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Reduced to its bare outline, the "Dreyfus Affair," which rocked French society for close to a decade, seems simple. The year was 1894, and officers in the French army suspected there was a spy in their midst, someone in the highest ranks, who was selling secrets to Germany. They checked a list of officers with access to the information passed,...
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On the cover of Geniuses of the American Musical Theatre: The Composers and Lyricists , six individuals are pictured, and not surprisingly, only one of them -- Cole Porter (again not surprisingly) -- is a non-Jew. Take into consideration that the author, Herbert Keyser, is Jewish and this becomes an all haimische endeavor. (The publisher is Applause, behind which stands...
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Eva Hesse must be placed on that ever-burgeoning list of crucially influential artists unknown to the majority of the general public. One reason for this unfortunate development may be that she died very young of a brain tumor nearly 40 years ago, when she was at her most productive and beginning to make a name for herself as one of...
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Even in Auschwitz, a certain tone found its place
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Why is it that the name Rachmil Bryks is not better known? Granted, he began writing his Holocaust fiction shortly after he left the camps -- that is, a decade or two before the world seemed willing or able to face such matters. And based on the four stories included in A Cat in the Ghetto , published by Persea...
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Profile

Robert Leiter served as senior editor of the Jewish Exponent before retiring in Dec. 2013. 

In his 30 years with the paper, he won many awards and held many positions, from full-time reporter to interim editor. For five years in the early 1980s, he was managing editor of Inside magazine, the Exponent's sister publication, and for seven years in the 2000s, he was the quarterly's editor in chief, while still working full time for the paper.

Since the mid-1980s, he reported from most of the major capitals of Europe for the Exponent, with an emphasis on the Eastern Bloc countries, during and after Communist rule. Throughout this period, he visited Poland, the two Germanies and the Soviet Union with greatest frequency, but also made visits to Austria, Hungary, Czechoslovakia, Bulgaria, Romania, the former Yugoslavia, Ukraine, Latvia, Lithuania and Estonia. He has also reported from Catalonia, Alsace, Zurich and Venice, as well as from Costa Rica, Norway, India and the Middle East. A number of his journalism awards have been for his reporting from Europe.

He is a contributing editor to The American Poetry Review, which is based in Philadelphia, and in the 1980s, he served as Murray Friedman's assistant to the U.S. Civil Rights Commission in Washington, D.C.

He has also been a freelance writer for 40 years and his book reviews, short stories, essays, interviews and profiles have appeared in The Nation, The New Republic, CommonwealDissent, The American Scholar, The Hudson Review, The New Leader, The Forward, Moment, Redbook, The Pennsylvania GazetteThe Philadelphia BulletinThe Philadelphia Inquirer, Philadelphia magazine, The New York Times, The New York Times Book Review, Partisan Review and many other mainstream local and national publications.

Contact

215-832-0726

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