Monday, November 24, 2014 Kislev 2, 5775

By:
Rabbi Shlomo Riskin
The Exodus narrative -- so central to our Passover seder -- also informs our social consciousness as a people. The Bible teaches in very strong words, v'ahavtem et ha'ger, you must love the stranger, the other, the individual who is the underdog in whatever society you happen to find yourself, ki gerim hayitem b'eretz Mitzrayim, because you were the other,...
Comment0
By:
Sister Mary Scullion
The story of Passover is a story shared by both Jews and Christians. And in a sense, it is a story that speaks to all people. In its deep wisdom, the Jewish tradition understands that it is not just a story from thousands of years ago, but that the cry of the Israelites for deliverance from their oppressors is a...
Comment0
A new survey of American Jews prompted much buzz this week, much of it focused on the level of support for President Barack Obama's re-election (62 percent). But more important in the long run are the findings in the Public Religion Research Institute survey about what drives Jewish identity and behavior. The most popular quality cited was "a commitment to...
Comment0
Talk about mass emigration. The Exodus, the story of our ancestors' departure from Egypt that we will recount next week at our seders, is the most dramatic of flight stories. Yet it represents only the beginning of our journey as a people on the move, a people who, throughout much of our history, were forced to flee oppression, degradation and...
Comment0
By:
Josh Feigelson
Of all the words we utter at the Pesach seder, the word k'ilu (it's translated as two words, "as if") rings most important. The word is found in Rabban Gamliel's Mishnaic declaration: "In every generation, every person is obligated to see himself or herself as if he or she personally went out of Egypt." "As if." This phrase signals the...
Comment0

Advertisement