Tuesday, October 21, 2014 Tishri 27, 5775
By:
Menachem Z. Rosensaft
For more than 2,500 years, these fast days have remained on the Jewish religious calendar, and the Book of Lamentations continues to be read on Tisha B'Av. This is as it should be. Even though it is a far more recent horror, the Holocaust was no less a national Jewish catastrophe than the destruction of the first and second Temples...
Comment0
On the second night of Passover, observant Jews began a practice known as S'firat Ha-Omer, counting the barley sheaf, a ritual counting of each of the 49 days between Passover and Shavuot. For many Jews, S'firat Ha-Omer is obscure, even irrelevant. This is a shame, for it speaks to an important value, one that our society needs now when issues...
Comment0
By:
Rabbi Jon E. Cutler
We take for granted that we can go to the supermarket and buy boxes of Passover matzah. For the Abayudaya community in Uganda, it's not such a simple thing. Last year, for the first time in a long time, the community could participate in fulfilling the mitzvah of eating matzah after I sent boxes via military airlift. Serving in 2011...
Comment0
By:
Rabbi Shlomo Riskin
The Exodus narrative -- so central to our Passover seder -- also informs our social consciousness as a people. The Bible teaches in very strong words, v'ahavtem et ha'ger, you must love the stranger, the other, the individual who is the underdog in whatever society you happen to find yourself, ki gerim hayitem b'eretz Mitzrayim, because you were the other,...
Comment0
By:
Sister Mary Scullion
The story of Passover is a story shared by both Jews and Christians. And in a sense, it is a story that speaks to all people. In its deep wisdom, the Jewish tradition understands that it is not just a story from thousands of years ago, but that the cry of the Israelites for deliverance from their oppressors is a...
Comment0
Advertisement
Advertisement

Advertisement