Tuesday, October 21, 2014 Tishri 27, 5775
Psychiatrist/neurologist offers new insight into affliction
By:
Rita Charleston, JE Feature
It took a while -- almost a century -- for the assumptions made about dyslexia in 1896 to catch up with Dr. Harold N. Levinson's theory, first espoused in 1973, about what he felt to be the cause of the malady. "Dyslexia has remained a scientific enigma, defying most attempts at medical understanding, diagnosis, prediction, treatment and prevention," explains Levinson,...
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Teens and seniors revisit a topic of 'embarrassment'
By:
Rachel Lesser, JE Feature
Nearly 50 women gathered at the Bucks Country Free Library in Doylestown in mid-March to hear a panel of speakers revisit "Sex and the Single Girl." Moderated by Eleanor Levie, chairwoman of the National Council of Jewish Women for Greater Philadelphia -- one of the event sponsors; others included the League of Women Voters and Planned Parenthood, both of Bucks...
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Or, when it comes to fertility implants and births, is it too much?
By:
Frank Rosci, JE Feature
With the births of octuplets to Nadya Suleman -- the California woman in whom six embryos were implanted, one of which split, and who is already the mother of six young children -- concerns about fertility treatments have suddenly become a hot-button issue. Such has been the case for some time, but in Suleman's situation, there is the issue of...
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And they also can be affectionate toward each other without embarrassment
By:
Frank Rosci, JE Feature
While it may have been a traditional social taboo for men to have shown affection toward other men publicly, beyond a firm handshake or a quick high-five, it's becoming clearer that the rules that govern the rituals of male bonding have changed these days, allowing -- even encouraging -- men to be more demonstrative. Signs of nonsexual, nonaggressive, nonthreatening greetings...
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New research in an animal model suggests that a diet high in inorganic phosphates -- found in a variety of processed foods, including meats, cheeses, beverages and bakery products -- might speed the growth of lung-cancer tumors and may even contribute to the development of those tumors in individuals predisposed to the disease. The study also suggests that dietary regulation...
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