Thursday, November 20, 2014 Heshvan 27, 5775

By:
Adin Even-Israel Steinsaltz
The start of the New Year, the month of Tishrei, is full of holy days, among them four foundational ones: Rosh Hashanah, Yom Kippur, Sukkot and Simchat Torah-Shemini Atzeret. They are as different from one another as possible. Yet, we may also think of all four as two pairs of two. The first two -- the day of memory and...
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When students come to Hillel of Greater Philadelphia seeking advice on how to handle a conflict between class and observing the High Holidays, Rabbi Howard Alpert said he advises them on how to discuss the issue with their professors, but he himself avoids intervening. His reasoning is that when a student has to explain such an absence to faculty it...
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By:
Ben Sales, Jewish Telegraphic Agency
Jerusalem After Jerzy heard about frequent vandalism at an old Jewish cemetery in his home city of Gdansk, Poland, he decided to visit the graveyard. It had fallen into such disrepair that "people would go there to drink beer," said Jerzy, who gave only his middle name due to fears of anti-Semitism. He made a few trips to the cemetery,...
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And just the right flavor at Rosh Hashanah time
By:
Ethel G.Hofman
Rosh Hashanah is one of my favorite holidays. It means sweet desserts galore, when even the savory dishes, such as stuffed cabbage, are infused with a sweet-tart flavor. Sweetness is a symbol of hope that the coming year will be filled with happiness and fulfillment. For Ashkenazi Jews, the first foods eaten on Rosh Hashanah are apple wedges dip­ped in...
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By:
Jamie Geller, Jewish Telegraphic Agency
So this is where it all comes together — all the thought, all the planning, the testing. And the tasting, of course — always the best part. In the coming year, may all of your meals be cooked to perfection — may nothing burn, nothing get soggy or fall apart. May it be a year of culinary delights and taste-bud...
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Religious Events

Fri. Nov 21
Makom Community
5:00 PM-6:00 PM
Fri. Nov 21
Ohev Shalom of Bucks County
6:00 PM
Fri. Nov 21
Old York Road Temple-Beth Am
6:00 PM-8:30 PM

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