Monday, December 22, 2014 Kislev 30, 5775
By:
Rabbi Sue Levi Elwell, Jewish Exponent Feature
KORACH, Numbers: 16:1-18:32 Korach is the halfway point on our journey through the challenging terrain of the book of Numbers. Each summer, this troubling portion calls out for interpretation, posing questions we had not previously noticed, hinting at options for alternative routes through the burning sand. This year, Korach's and Dathan and Abiram's intertwined rebellions against established leadership shed an...
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By:
Rabbi Joshua Runyan
SHLACH, Numbers: 13:1-15:41 It's hard not to wonder: If a congressional committee of inquiry investigated the spies discussed in this week's portion -- much as several have done in regards to the CIA and other organs of America's intelligence establishment -- what would it find they did wrong? Commentators through time have grappled with why the spies -- who at...
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BEHA'ALOTCHA, Numbers: 8:1-12:16
By:
Rabbi Danielle Stillman
Who hasn't felt overworked and wanted to complain about it? And who hasn't felt, at times, that work is also our most important responsibility? In this week's portion, we identify with the Jewish people and with Moses. The Israelites complain about hunger -- and then gorge themselves on quail when it comes. Miriam and Aaron complain that Moses is taking...
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Naso, Numbers 4:21-7:89
By:
Rabbi Howard A. Addison
Naso contains the most powerful of scriptural blessings, Birkat Kohanim, the Threefold Priestly Benediction. Through a 15-word invocation, Aaron and his descendants are commanded to confer upon the people Israel God's blessing and protection, radiance and grace, favor and peace. This moving brachah is invoked daily during morning and afternoon services, every Friday evening when we bless our children, and...
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SHAVUOT
By:
Rabbi Dr. Tzvi Hersh Weinreb
For those of us outside of Israel, there is no "portion of the week" this coming Sabbath. The two-day holiday of Shavuot falls on Friday and Saturday, and pre-empts the regular reading. Instead, I will devote this column to the book of Ruth, which is heard at shul this week. There is hardly an example of human tragedy that is...
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