Tuesday, September 30, 2014 Tishri 6, 5775
By:
Louise Fiszer, JE Feature
Each Rosh Hashanah, as I set my table, I remember my mother setting hers with the new fruits of the season: a variety of apples, perhaps some pears and a bowl of dates and dried figs. This was in Brooklyn, where the pomegranates, fresh figs, avocados and persimmons that grace my holiday table didn't exist, except at fancy grocers that...
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Sweetness and abundance are not confined just to foods on Rosh Hashanah. Conversations are supposed to be joyous and lengthy as well -- it is, in fact, forbidden to display anger on the holiday. So, here are some recipes to try at this year's holiday dinner which might just help ensure that the mood stays sweet and light. Also remember,...
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Soups are a cool way to bring in Shavuot
By:
Linda Morel, Jewish Telegraphic Agency
Shavuot celebrations often center around brunch, where lox and bagels grab the attention. Those who branch out typically gravitate to blintzes and kugels. But in the Old Country, Shavuot meals often started with cold, creamy soups -- an appetizer that has all but disappeared in today's grab-and-go world. I suspect that cold soups have been replaced by smoothies, a staple...
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By:
Rabbi Jon Cutler
In the traditional reading of the Haggadah, the following text is heard at Passover seders: "Your ancestors dwelt on the other side of the river, Terah, the father of Abraham and the father of Nahor, and they served other gods. And I took your father Abraham from the other side of the river, and led him throughout all the land...
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By:
Ethel Hofman
Lag B'Omer represents a joyful break between Passover and Shavuot. It takes place on the 33rd day after the second day of Passover, in the midst of the seven weeks between Passover and Shavuot. (Lag is the Hebrew numerical equivalent of 33). In Israel, families celebrate by hiking in the hills or picnicking in one of the parks. For others,...
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