Friday, August 29, 2014 Elul 3, 5774
By:
Rivka Tal
In Israel, the weather is almost always warm during the seven-day festival of Sukkot. And many families enjoy their holiday meals in the palm-branch-roofed sukkah. Suk­kot are often “attached” to the ubiquitous small Israeli apart­ments or down a few flights of stairs. Easy-to-prepare — and-transport — meals are handy at this time of the year, and I believe we can...
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By:
Linda Morel
Sukkot desserts are a distinct genre in Jewish cuisine. Traditional holiday sweets are made with fall fruits such as pears, plums and late-season berries. Holiday pastries are studded as well with dried fruits, nuts and seasonal spices such as cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg and cardamom. Fruits that are abundant in seeds — notably pomegranates — also are popular in Sukkot baking...
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Over the next two years, Reform Congregation Rodeph Shalom, the National Museum of American Jewish History, the Gershman Y and Temple University's Feinstein Center for American Jewish History will host a variety of programs focused on food, ethics, sustainability and "eating Jewish."
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Amid these Days of Awe, I remember one of my favorite Torah portions, Nehemiah, which describes how our ancestors celebrated Rosh Hashanah when they returned to Israel from Persia after a long exile. It was a time of rebuilding and renewal, and the people sought inspiration from the words of our prophets. On the first day of Rosh Hashanah, men...
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By:
Linda Morel
“Nineteen people?” my husband said. “Where are you going to put them all?” Last year, I invited more people to break the Yom Kippur fast than I could seat around tables. While my heart expanded to include everyone, unfortunately my walls are rigid. I decided to serve dinner buffet style. Yet I worried that this pivotal meal, a transition from...
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