Thursday, September 18, 2014 Elul 23, 5774
By:
Sarah Chandler, MyJewishLearning
NEW YORK -- For most adults, the central experience of Yom Kippur is fasting. By abstaining from food and drink, we exercise control over our bodies and do not give in to our most basic impulses. This makes it pretty easy to feel the "affliction" that the Torah mandates. But parents sometimes find it difficult to include children in the...
Comment0
Binge or bust: How to prepare for that last meal before Yom Kippur
By:
Rita Charleston, JE Feature
I always loved going to my Bubbe Minnie's house, especially during the High Holidays. She'd sit around her dining table with me -- one of her younger grandchildren -- enjoying the last meal before Yom Kippur, and telling me I didn't have to start fasting until I got up from the table. Actually, because I was only 3 or 4...
Comment0
... and hearty meals for the holidays
Food is a vital part of the holidays, even at Yom Kippur, which is preceded by a major meal and followed by a break-the-fast supper. Orthodox Union recipe expert Eileen Goltz offers the following recipes for Rosh Hashanah, Yom Kippur and Sukkot. Goltz was born and raised in the Chicago area, and graduated from Indiana University and the Cordon Bleu...
Comment0
Here are a few tips and some menu items to help you get through the day
By:
Ethel Hofman, JE Feature
Each year at the High Holidays, we wish each other " L'Shanah Tovah " (to a good year) and a light fast. But, for many, fasting is difficult and exhausting. Michael M. Segal, M.D., Ph.D., notes that most people think the difficulty of fasting is feeling "hungry." Not so, he says. Avoiding thirst is much more important for how you...
Comment0
Comment0

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement