Sunday, August 31, 2014 Elul 5, 5774
By:
JNS.org
While the relationship linking Rosh Hashanah with apples and honey never grows old, the elegant and elusive pomegranate is less acknowledged, though profoundly tied to biblical literature and ancient agriculture.
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Even if a 20-something pro­fessional attends the High Holiday Wine Tasting event, has a few drinks, acquires tickets for Rosh Ha­sha­nah, attends services -- but then doesn't join any congregation, the event is not a waste of time for a synagogue, said Michael Meketon of Congregation Levy Ha-Ir. "At that age, I didn't really care about affiliation," said Meketon, 48,...
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By:
Rivka Tal
Challah is the braided egg-rich loaf of bread that we traditionally eat on the Sabbath and holidays — two loaves of challah at each of the three Shabbat meals. Challah in Israel is classified as sweet, semi-sweet and “regular.” (My personal favorite is what is called baguette challah, which I have yet to duplicate at home.) But for Rosh Hashanah,...
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By:
Jonathan Kremer, Jewish Exponent Feature
A family enters the synagogue room, a little boy holding his parents' hands and an older sister looking around with anticipation. At the front, the Rosh Hasha­nah service is being led by congregants. On a mat in the corner, children play quietly, then pause for a story that leads to a discussion of forgiveness. Some of the parents seated on...
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Take a break from ­tradition by trying these offbeat recipes
By:
Naomi Muller, Jewish Exponent Feature
On Rosh Hashanah, most Jews indulge in sweet foods to express their desire for a sweet year. Problems arise, however, when a guest or family member is unable to tolerate sugar and honey for either medical or dietary reasons. Obviously, we all desire a year filled with all manner of delicious blessings. The question is how to find substitutes for...
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