Monday, March 2, 2015 AdarI 11, 5775
Adding a Mexican flair to Passover
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Tim Spinner and Brian Sirhal want you to think trilingually this Pesach. In addition to English and Hebrew, they want you to brush up on your Spanish phrases like “salmon tostada,” “red chile-matzah ball soup,” “brisket tacos” and “fresh berry pavlova.” OK, so the pavlova is actually Antipodean in origin and was created in honor of legendary Russian ballerina Anna...
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Why do we celebrate Elijah at Passover?
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At seders around the world, millions of cups of wine are poured in honor of one man: Elijah. Why is Elijah the Prophet part of the seder when he lived centuries after the Exodus?
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Rivka Tal, Jewish Exponent Feature
Let's face it, sometimes Passover food can get monotonous -- how many potatoes can one person eat? So when the family tires of chicken and potatoes or roast and potatoes, why not try using whole matzah as a raw material? There are matzah kugels and matzah roll-ups. Sephardi Jews often dampen matzah before eating it; then it can be filled...
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Eileen Goltz, Jewish Exponent Feature
SLICE OF LIFE One of the biggest problems with the week of Pesach is that so much of the food is so heavy. Eggs, oil, matzah meal and meat -- lots and lots of meat and chicken, and then maybe some more meat. Sometimes, all you want is a little bit of nothing to fill in the times between the...
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By:
Arthur Waskow and Phyllis Berman
If a pharaoh fell in the Red Sea but nobody told the story, did it actually happen? No. If no pharaoh fell in the Red Sea, but we told the story for 3,000 years, did it actually happen? Yes. Is it still happening? Yes. To people brought up in the modern mode of focusing on cold, hard facts, these responses...
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