Friday, May 29, 2015 Sivan 11, 5775
Passover baking is the greatest annual challenge in the Jewish kitchen because dessert recipes can't use flour, yeast, soy milk, or even pure vanilla. And shifting from flour to matzah meal and potato starch is not intuitive, even for experienced bakers.
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By:
Linda Morel, JE Feature
At Passover, this cook serves 12 different kinds of charoset, mostly from countries in the Sephardi world.
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By:
Ethel Hofman, Jewish Exponent Feature
For home cooks, the eight days of Passover have always constituted a challenge. The basic rule has been that any product that is fermented or can cause fermentation may not be eaten. That includes five grains: wheat, rye, barley, oats and spelt. However, Sephardic tradition has always allowed rice to be used. Growing up in Scotland in the 1960s, as...
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By:
Jamie Geller, Jewish Telegraphic Agency
Want to know a little secret that helps me keep my kitchen cool during the major food holiday that's fast approaching? Last year, 99 percent of what I made for Passover wouldn't qualify as a Passover recipe. Of course the dishes were all kosher for Passover, but they didn't require any major Passover ingredient tweaks. These recipes were , however,...
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By:
Rivka Tal, Jewish Exponent Feature
Let's face it, sometimes Passover food can get monotonous -- how many potatoes can one person eat? So when the family tires of chicken and potatoes or roast and potatoes, why not try using whole matzah as a raw material? There are matzah kugels and matzah roll-ups. Sephardi Jews often dampen matzah before eating it; then it can be filled...
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