Monday, December 22, 2014 Kislev 30, 5775
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As a young girl, Marilyn Rosenthal Baltz really had no ties to Judaism. Her parents - Russian immigrants - owned a candy store in Kensington, where they worked seven days a week, and didn't belong to a synagogue. When she was in third grade, in the 1940s, someone told her about the Hebrew Sunday School Society - which sponsored sessions...
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Conditions had become crowded at Congregation Beth Or's Spring House facility, a manor house the congregation has called home since 1974. With more than 1,000 member families and 700 children enrolled in its religious school, Sunday-morning Hebrew school became a logistical nightmare, even without factoring in the probability of a Men's Club or Sisterhood event at the same time. Now,...
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Sitting at her desk in the middle of a frenetic Center City newsroom, Hadas Kuznits extracts audio from a speech with an editor via intercom as she fields calls on her cell phone, monitors several police scanners and every so often, consults a pager that feeds her breaking-news updates. "This is a slow pace," insists Kuznits, 30, an on-air reporter...
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Octogenarian Helen Thomas - better known as the "Dean of the Washington Press Corps" - has not been shy about criticizing the president or the war in Iraq. From interviews to speeches to her forthcoming book, Watchdogs of Democracy? The Waning Washington Press Corps and How It Has Failed the Public , the 87-year-old reporter turned columnist - who still...
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While walking through a South Florida flea market with his longtime wife, Judith, several years ago, Johanan Zelikovsky, 86, noticed an ambulance marked with Hebrew and English lettering. After some inquiry, the Zelikovskys realized that the vehicle was set to be donated to Israel. Since the couple lived there before immigrating to the United States in the 1950s, they both...
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