Tuesday, May 26, 2015 Sivan 8, 5775
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On the streets where Benjamin Franklin walked, James and Dolly Madison once lived, and George Washington may have slept, Colonial-era Jews also made their presence -- albeit a subtle one -- known. The cobblestone streets that William Penn designed between the Delaware and Schuykill rivers welcomed Jews as merchants, religious leaders and Revolutionary War supporters -- so much so that,...
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Back in the 1980s and '90s, when Rabbi Lance Sussman was researching the life of 19th-century Jewish leader Isaac Leeser, he would shuttle back and forth between institutes in Cincinnati and Philadelphia, the repositories where the bulk of Leeser's papers were stored. The rabbi kept his notes on thousands of index cards and stored his work on numerous floppy disks...
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To mark the 220th anniversary of the signing of the U.S. Constitution by its framers, Aharon Barak, recently retired president of the Supreme Court of Israel, outlined the role judges play in his country's democratic process -- one that's besieged by security concerns and lacks a written constitution to guide jurisprudence. "Every battle a country faces must be waged in...
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Rachel Silverman, JE Feature
With its groundbreaking just about two weeks away, the National Museum of American Jewish History has reached an impressive milestone: It's raised $100 million of the $150 million needed to construct a new 100,000-square-foot home on Independence Mall. Said George M. Ross, the museum's capital-campaign chairman: "It says a lot for this project to have raised" that much. "I've spoken...
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When Henri Parens was 12 years old, he escaped a French concentration camp by crawling across train tracks, running through a barren vineyard and hiding in a toilet stall overnight. The following year, he traveled to the United States by himself, where he lived with a host family in Pittsburgh. It was then, in 1942, that he learned that his...
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