Thursday, December 25, 2014 Tevet 3, 5775
Wikipedia defines a kugel as a baked pudding or casserole -- its roots are Ashkenazi -- similar to a pie, most commonly made from egg noodles (Lokshen kugel) or potatoes, though at times made of zucchini, apples, spinach, broccoli, cranberry or sweet potato. The first kugels were made from bread and flour and were savory rather than sweet. About 800...
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Chef Robert Bennett of Classic Cake in Cherry Hill, N.J., and Washington Township, N.J., has whipped up these holiday-inspired sweet treats for the Jewish New Year. Ruggulah Delicate pastry wrapped around assorted fillings, including cinnamon, chocolate chip and raspberry, then rolled in sugar. 2 cups all-purpose flour 1/4 tsp. salt 1 cup unsalted butter 1 package (8 oz.) cream cheese...
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Rosh Hashanah brings families together to celebrate the autumn harvest and a sweet new year. Along with any good celebration comes food. Naturally sweet foods like honey, apples, raisins and carrots are served at holiday meals to remind us of the sweet things that lie ahead. Jill Colella Bloomfield, author of Jewish Holidays Cookbook: Festive Meals for Celebrating the Year...
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By:
Linda Morel
WHAT'S COOKING? What would Rosh Hashanah be without dipping sliced apples into honey? This cherished tradition symbolizes the hope for sweetness in the New Year. To underscore this wish, I always bake an apple pie, an apple torte or an apple cake. But I don't limit apples to desserts. I sprinkle them into as many appetizers and side dishes as...
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By:
Ethel Hofman
THE JEWISH KITCHEN It's been more than two years since I visited the Jewish community of Tunis, but I can still taste the pungent, aromatic seasonings of dishes rooted in Sephardi tradition: succulent dates and pomegranates, couscous sweetened with honey and spices, the delicate fragrance of jasmine everywhere. So I was thrilled to meet up with Joel Perez, a handsome,...
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