Saturday, April 25, 2015 Iyyar 6, 5775
By:
Rivka Tal
Certain comfort foods are definitely at their best when eaten at this time of year, especially in the cool of the evening. Cherry Pie Without Sugar or Fat (Pareve or Dairy) Yes, phyllo dough can be a challenge to work with, but in this recipe the dough is purposely torn, making life just that much easier. 6 sheets phyllo pastry...
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By:
Eileen Goltz
Every holiday, I start looking for a fresh vegetable to serve that isn’t connected to the perennial carrot tzimmes and/or green beans. I can’t afford asparagus for 12 — it’s almost as much as my shul dues — and broccoli is just too prosaic. While I’ve heard leeks called the “poor man’s asparagus,” they are truly a stand-out vegetable in...
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By:
Ethel Hofman
Is there such a thing as Israeli cuisine? After all, Israel is a nation of immigrants; they came from Eastern Europe, Russia, Yemen, Ethiopia … from all corners of the world. They arrived in Palestine with their own culinary customs and culture, with cooking pots slung over their shoulders and recipes carried in their memories. But they soon found that...
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Over the next two years, Reform Congregation Rodeph Shalom, the National Museum of American Jewish History, the Gershman Y and Temple University's Feinstein Center for American Jewish History will host a variety of programs focused on food, ethics, sustainability and "eating Jewish."
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By:
Linda Morel
Sukkot desserts are a distinct genre in Jewish cuisine. Traditional holiday sweets are made with fall fruits such as pears, plums and late-season berries. Holiday pastries are studded as well with dried fruits, nuts and seasonal spices such as cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg and cardamom. Fruits that are abundant in seeds — notably pomegranates — also are popular in Sukkot baking...
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