Wednesday, August 27, 2014 Elul 1, 5774
If you haven’t tried this tantalizing staple in the past, why not serve it as the weather starts to cool down? It’s perfect year-round, but it’s best right around now. Meat-Stuffed Cabbage (Meat) 2 large cabbages 1 large onion 2 cloves garlic, chopped 1 lb. stew meat, cut into cubes 1 can (29 oz.) tomato sauce 1 can (6 oz.)...
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By:
Ethel Hofman
Is there such a thing as Israeli cuisine? After all, Israel is a nation of immigrants; they came from Eastern Europe, Russia, Yemen, Ethiopia … from all corners of the world. They arrived in Palestine with their own culinary customs and culture, with cooking pots slung over their shoulders and recipes carried in their memories. But they soon found that...
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By:
Eileen Goltz
Every holiday, I start looking for a fresh vegetable to serve that isn’t connected to the perennial carrot tzimmes and/or green beans. I can’t afford asparagus for 12 — it’s almost as much as my shul dues — and broccoli is just too prosaic. While I’ve heard leeks called the “poor man’s asparagus,” they are truly a stand-out vegetable in...
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By:
Rivka Tal
In Israel, the weather is almost always warm during the seven-day festival of Sukkot. And many families enjoy their holiday meals in the palm-branch-roofed sukkah. Suk­kot are often “attached” to the ubiquitous small Israeli apart­ments or down a few flights of stairs. Easy-to-prepare — and-transport — meals are handy at this time of the year, and I believe we can...
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By:
Linda Morel
Sukkot desserts are a distinct genre in Jewish cuisine. Traditional holiday sweets are made with fall fruits such as pears, plums and late-season berries. Holiday pastries are studded as well with dried fruits, nuts and seasonal spices such as cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg and cardamom. Fruits that are abundant in seeds — notably pomegranates — also are popular in Sukkot baking...
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