Friday, October 31, 2014 Heshvan 7, 5775
By:
My classical-music education began in earnest during my freshman year in college, way out in the middle of Iowa corn country, a terrain we inbred Easterners might think of as devoid of culture. But those of us who attended the University of Iowa beginning in the mid-1960s were given a great gift - if we were willing to take advantage...
Comment0
By:
Sarah Bernhardt. For anyone enamored of the theater, hers is a mythic name. And for anyone with the added love of Proust, Bernhardt is twice mythic, as she appears in the French novelist's great seven-part work, In Search of Lost Time , as the adored Berma; in fact, the novel's central character, Marcel, evokes her example many times as the...
Comment0
A Most Successful Synthesis
By:
Until the modern period, architecture was not a profession much open to Jews. Judaism itself - except perhaps for the Temple periods in Jerusalem - never really made much fuss about buildings per se. Synagogues, in the ghettos and shtetls of Europe, at least through a good part of the 19th century, were not generally grand affairs (western Europe was...
Comment0
By:
Jessica Weiner has a special place where she always seems to experience those Oprah-esque "ah-ha" lightbulb moments: the bathroom. It was in her college dormitory's public loo that she noticed a stall's graffiti - graffiti that convinced her not to commit suicide - and in a New York City bookstore ladies room where Weiner was inspired to write Do I...
Comment0
By:
The first criticism I read about the famous short-story writer Isaac Babel was an essay by Lionel Trilling, then the dean of the New York Jewish intellectual crowd and one of the most prominent academics in the country. His piece was, at the time, one of the central pronouncements on the Soviet Jewish writer's remarkable work and brief, tragic life...
Comment0
Advertisement
Advertisement

Advertisement