Friday, December 19, 2014 Kislev 27, 5775
By:
Peter Ephross, Jewish Telegraphic Agency
Nearly all fans of baseball history have heard of Hank Greenberg. Most have heard of Al Rosen. But fewer have heard of Cal Abrams, and hardly any, it's safe to say, have heard of Lou Limmer. All four are members of a compelling team -- the 165 American Jews who played Major League Baseball between the 1870s and the end...
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By:
Phyllis Rubin, Jewish Exponent Feature
Many people feel they spend their time jumping through hoops and navigating hurdles, and end up drained by the effort. Eliana Yankelev, a senior at Lower Merion High School, spends much of her time jumping actual hurdles -- and seems to do it effortlessly. "I get really nervous before big races. I can't eat breakfast; I'm really hot, and my...
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Can multimillionaire business mogul and Abington native Adam Aron become the Sixers net prophet? It's looking good -- as Philly's once-failed and feeble pro basketball team suddenly, almost inexplicably, has got game. It's been a torrid, turnover-free four months since Aron and Wharton School graduate Joshua Harris bought the team, along with a select group of co-owners. In the process,...
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Why do some children follow in their parents' footsteps and others seek a totally different path? James "Jamie" Chadwin, head men's basketball coach at Immaculata University in Chester County, hasn't thought much about that question. Ever since Jamie Chadwin was a kid hanging out in the gymnasium at Abington Friends, he has tried to absorb everything he could about the...
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America's top male tennis pros have struggled on red clay, a surface that can cause even surefooted players to stumble, tending to reward patience and endurance, not power and aggression. Hard-serving Andy Roddick, for example, the best American men's player of the past decade, has never made it past the fourth round of the French Open, played on clay at...
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