Sunday, December 21, 2014 Kislev 29, 5775
By:
Richard Greenberg, Washington Jewish Week
Jews are known as the "People of the Book," and that book, which has sustained them, guided them and kept them roughly on the same page throughout the generations, is, of course ... the Maxwell House Haggadah. Produced as a sales promotion by Maxwell House for the past 70-plus years (at least 50 million have been printed), the coffee maker's...
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By:
Roger Horowitz
Passover brings Jews together -- across generations, denominations and distances -- as we travel to see parents, children, aunts, uncles and friends at our annual seders. Three-quarters of the Philadelphia-area's Jewish households will participate in a seder next week, according to a 2009 study sponsored by the Jewish Federation of Greater Philadelphia. Much of this holiday is about food --...
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For most of my life, when Pesach arrived, I would try, as the Hagaddah instructs, to think of myself as someone who had personally gone out of Egypt -- and fail. My problem wasn't that I was a comfortable, middle-class American Jew rather than the beaten, starving, abject heir of 400 years of enslavement. No, the problem was that I...
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By:
After prepping for Passover by preparing matzah-ball soup, kugel and everything in between, Shelley Chamberlain of Cheltenham is more than happy to sit back for a catered second seder at her synagogue. Growing up in a Reform home in Pittsburgh, the now 52-year-old said that her family almost never took part in two seders: One was considered enough. After all,...
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By:
Linda Morel, Jewish Exponent Feature
WHAT'S COOKING? The first time we hosted Pesach, I was so busy cooking that I neglected the most essential part of the meal -- the seder's ceremonial foods. "Did you buy horseradish root?" my husband asked. "Isn't the bottled stuff good enough?" I replied. "Yes, but I like a real root on the seder plate," he said. "And where is...
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